Saturday, April 20, 2019

R - Rare Mental Disorders #AtoZ #MentalHealthAwareness


Worldwide, about 450 million individuals have some sort of mental illness. Whereas such illnesses as anxiety disorder, depression, and eating disorders are widely known and seen more commonly in the population, there are a plethora of rare psychiatric illnesses that physicians may encounter.

Although these disorders are seldom seen, it is important that physicians remain aware of them to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment for patients with these illnesses. These rare psychiatric syndromes range from reactions to overwhelming situations, delusions as a result of traumatic brain injury, and specific manifestations due to the presence of other psychiatric syndromes.

Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Also known as Todd syndrome, Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a neurologic condition “in which a patient’s sense of body image, space, and/or time [is] distorted,” according to Medscape. Those experiencing AIWS may have hallucinations, sensory distortion and an altered sense of velocity. AIWS results from change in perception. Though there are many symptoms, the most prevalent one is altered body image: Patients are confused about the size and shape of parts of their bodies. These symptoms can trigger panic and fear responses.

Aboulomania

People with aboulomania report being paralyzed with indecision over every minor decision they have to make. Normal daily activities such as going for a walk, getting some work done become impossibly difficult to prioritize. What’s interesting about aboulomania is that the affected person is otherwise completely normal. People with the condition just can’t stop obsessively working up elaborate arguments in favor of deciding the flavor of their next drink or pizza topping.




Stendhal Syndrome

Those with Stendhal syndrome experience physical and emotional anxiety as well as panic attacks, dissociative experiences, confusion and hallucinations when exposed to art. These symptoms are usually triggered by “art that is perceived as particularly beautiful or when the individual is exposed to large quantities of art that are concentrated in a single place,” such as a museum or gallery. This syndrome is named after a 19th-century French author who experienced the symptoms during a trip to Florence in 1817. Stendhal syndrome may also be called hyperculturemia or Florence syndrome.

Celebriphilia

This is a pathological desire to have sex with someone famous. It is more than admiration or interest in being famous. This disorder is characterized by feeling an incredibly intense romantic or sexual desire for a celebrity.



Capgras Syndrome

This syndrome is named for Joseph Capgras, a French psychiatrist who explored the illusion of doubles. Those with Capgras syndrome hold the delusional belief that someone in their life, usually a spouse, close friend or family member, has been replaced by an impostor. It can occur in patients with schizophrenia, dementia, epilepsy and after traumatic brain injury. Treatment approaches mirror those utilized for the underlying disorders and often include antipsychotic medications.


DISCLAIMER: All the information being provided her has been sourced from the internet and books and some also via personal experiences. It has no medical authentication per se so suggestions if followed must be done in consultation with a trained mental health professional.

References:




This post is a part of April Blogging from A To Z Challenge
You can find all my posts here.


Friday, April 19, 2019

Q - Quick Mental Health Facts #AtoZ #MentalHealthAwareness


May is Mental Health Awareness Month every year. Mental Health Awareness Month aims to de-stigmatize this condition by encouraging open conversations as well as developing and implementing effective methods for treatment.
Mental health is one of the most perplexing, fascinating, and concerning issues in modern society. When the human brain malfunctions, it is often a result of complex, interconnected factors involving the whole body. In this fascinating account, we dig deeper and discover some of the most startling, lesser known, and downright weird facts about both well-known and very obscure mental disorders.



·         Mental illnesses can affect people of any age, race, religion, or income. A mental illness is a medical condition that disrupts a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, and ability to relate to others and daily functioning.

·         Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Depression in people rose by 18% between 2005 and 2015.

·         About half of mental disorders begin before the age of 14, three-quarters by age 24.6 Despite effective treatments, there are long delays—sometimes decades—between the first onset of symptoms and when people seek and receive treatment.

·         Globally, there is huge inequity in the distribution of skilled human resources for mental health.

·         According to several studies by psychiatric services, individuals with mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or depression were 2.6 times as likely to develop cancer.

·         Suicide accounts for over 800,000 deaths globally each year, with over 41,000 in the U.S. alone. It is the second leading cause of death worldwide for 15-29 year olds.

·         Many factors can lead to mental illness, including genetics, physical illness or injury, and traumatic life experiences.




·         Many people do not seek treatment for mental illness due to the associated stigma. Only 44% of adults with diagnosable mental illnesses receive treatment.

·         Members of the LGBTQ community are twice as likely as straight individuals to have a mental health condition.

·         70-90% of people who seek proper treatment for mental health disorders witness a significant reduction in symptoms.

·         Most people living with mental illness lead productive lives despite their challenges.

·         Sometimes we say we're fine when we're not. So if anyone close to you is acting differently: ask twice.

DISCLAIMER: All the information being provided her has been sourced from the internet and books and some also via personal experiences. It has no medical authentication per se so suggestions if followed must be done in consultation with a trained mental health professional.

References:



This post is a part of April Blogging from A To Z Challenge
You can find all my posts here.



Thursday, April 18, 2019

P - PTSD #AtoZ #MentalHealthAwareness


PTSD has been known by many names in the past, such as “shell shock” during the years of World War I and “combat fatigue” after World War II. Women are twice as likely as men to have PTSD. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder caused by very stressful, frightening or distressing events.


Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that can occur in people who have experienced or witnessed a traumatic event such as a natural disaster, a serious accident, a terrorist act, war/combat, rape or other violent personal assault.

People with PTSD may avoid situations or people that remind them of the traumatic event, and they may have strong negative reactions to something as ordinary as a loud noise or an accidental touch.



PTSD is probably caused by a complex mix of:
  • ·         Stressful experiences, including the amount and severity of trauma you've gone through in your life
  • ·         Inherited mental health risks, such as a family history of anxiety and depression
  • ·         Inherited features of your personality — often called your temperament
  • ·         The way your brain regulates the chemicals and hormones your body releases in response to stress



A diagnosis of PTSD requires exposure to an upsetting traumatic event. However, exposure could be indirect rather than first hand. For example, PTSD could occur in an individual learning about the violent death of a close family. It can also occur as a result of repeated exposure to horrible details of trauma such as police officers exposed to details of child abuse cases.


Symptoms of PTSD fall into four categories. Specific symptoms can vary in severity.
  • ·         Intrusive thoughts such as repeated, involuntary memories; distressing dreams; or flashbacks of the traumatic event.
  • ·         Avoiding reminders of the traumatic event may include avoiding people, places, activities, objects and situations that bring on distressing memories. People may try to avoid remembering or thinking about the traumatic event.
  • ·         Negative thoughts and feelings may include on-going and distorted beliefs about oneself or others, much less interest in activities previously enjoyed; or feeling detached or estranged from others.
  • ·         Arousal and reactive symptoms may include being irritable and having angry outbursts; behaving recklessly or in a self-destructive way; being easily startled; or having problems concentrating or sleeping.






Trauma affects school-aged children and teenagers differently than adults. If diagnosed with PTSD, the symptoms in children and teens can also look different.
On the anniversary of a traumatic event, some survivors have an increase in distress. These "anniversary reactions" can range from feeling mildly upset for a day or two to a more extreme reaction with more severe mental health or medical symptoms.

Trauma-focused psychotherapies are the most highly recommended type of treatment for PTSD. "Trauma-focused" means that the treatment focuses on the memory of the traumatic event or its meaning.
These treatments use different techniques to help you process your traumatic experience. Some involve visualizing, talking, or thinking about the traumatic memory. Others focus on changing unhelpful beliefs about the trauma.


DISCLAIMER: All the information being provided her has been sourced from the internet and books and some also via personal experiences. It has no medical authentication per se so suggestions if followed must be done in consultation with a trained mental health professional.

References:





 This post is a part of April Blogging from A To Z Challenge

You can find all my posts here.




Wednesday, April 17, 2019

O - Obsessive Compulsive Disorder #AtoZ #MentalHealthAwareness

Obsessions are thoughts, images or impulses that occur over and over again and feel outside of the person’s control. Compulsions are the second part of obsessive compulsive disorder. These are repetitive behaviors or thoughts that a person uses with the intention of neutralizing, counteracting, or making their obsessions go away.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental health disorder that affects people of all ages and walks of life, and occurs when a person gets caught in a cycle of obsessions and compulsions

Obsessions are unwanted, intrusive thoughts, images or urges that trigger intensely distressing feelings. Compulsions are behaviors an individual engages in to attempt to get rid of the obsessions and/or decrease his or her distress.




Obsessions are typically accompanied by intense and uncomfortable feelings such as fear, disgust, doubt, or a feeling that things have to be done in a way that is “just right.” In the context of OCD, obsessions are time consuming and get in the way of important activities the person values. This last part is extremely important to keep in mind as it, in part, determines whether someone has OCD — a psychological disorder — rather than an obsessive personality trait.  

Obsessive-compulsive disorder usually includes both obsessions and compulsions. But it's also possible to have only obsession symptoms or only compulsion symptoms.

A few common obsessions are:

·         Contamination
Ø  Germs/disease (examples: herpes, HIV)
Ø  Environmental contaminants (examples: asbestos, radiation)
Ø  Dirt

·         Losing Control
Ø  Fear of acting on an impulse to harm oneself
Ø  Fear of blurting out obscenities or insults
Ø  Fear of stealing things (Kleptomania)

·         Obsessions Related to Perfectionism
Ø  Concern about evenness or exactness
Ø  Inability to decide whether to keep or to discard things
Ø  Fear of losing things
·         Unwanted Sexual Thoughts
·         Religious Obsessions (Scrupulosity)
·         Other Obsessions
Ø  Concern with getting a physical illness or disease (not by contamination, e.g. cancer)
Ø  Superstitious ideas about lucky/unlucky numbers certain colors

Common compulsions include:
Ø  Washing and cleaning everything or certain things
Ø  Checking things again and again
Ø  Mental compulsions
Ø  Repeating




A diagnosis of OCD requires the presence of obsession and/or compulsions that are time-consuming (more than one hour a day), cause major distress, and impair work, social or other important function.

Some individuals with OCD also have a tic disorder. Motor tics are sudden, brief, repetitive movements, such as eye blinking and other eye movements, facial grimacing, shoulder shrugging, and head or shoulder jerking. Common vocal tics include repetitive throat-clearing, sniffing, or grunting sounds.

OCD is typically treated with medication, psychotherapy or a combination of the two.
There's no sure way to prevent obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, getting treatment as soon as possible may help prevent OCD from worsening and disrupting activities and your daily routine.


DISCLAIMER: All the information being provided her has been sourced from the internet and books and some also via personal experiences. It has no medical authentication per se so suggestions if followed must be done in consultation with a trained mental health professional.

References:




This post is a part of April Blogging from A To Z Challenge
You can find all my posts here.



Tuesday, April 16, 2019

N - Narcissistic Personality Disorder #AtoZ #MentalHealthAwareness


Narcissistic personality disorder is found more commonly in men. The cause is unknown but likely involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

The term comes from a character in Greek mythology; called Narcissus. He saw his reflection in a pool of water and fell in love with it. It is characterized by an extreme sense of self-worth. Other features include being quick to anger and prone to irritation. For a diagnosis, the symptoms must be persistent and chronic.

The hallmarks of Narcissistic Personality Disorder are grandiosity, a lack of empathy for other people, and a need for admiration. Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is best described as a paradox. People with NPD may act superior and confident, but are often fragile and lack self-esteem. They crave attention and praise yet are unable to form close relationships. NPD causes great distress to both the person with the disorder and those around them.



People with this condition are frequently described as arrogant, self-centered, manipulative, and demanding. They may also have grandiose fantasies and may be convinced that they deserve special treatment. These characteristics typically begin in early adulthood and must be consistently evident in multiple contexts, such as at work and in relationships.

It's not known what causes narcissistic personality disorder. As with personality development and with other mental health disorders, the cause of narcissistic personality disorder is likely complex. 

Narcissistic personality disorder may be linked to:
  • ·         Environment ― mismatches in parent-child relationships with either excessive adoration or excessive criticism that is poorly attuned to the child's experience
  • ·         Genetics ― inherited characteristics
  • ·         Neurobiology — the connection between the brain and behavior and thinking



People with NPD often try to associate with other people they believe are unique or gifted in some way, which can enhance their own self-esteem. They tend to seek excessive admiration and attention and have difficulty tolerating criticism or defeat.



They exhibit five or more of the following traits, which are present by early adulthood and across contexts:
  • ·         A grandiose sense of self-importance
  • ·         Preoccupation with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love
  • ·         Belief that one is special and can only be understood by or associate with special people or institutions
  • ·         A need for excessive admiration
  • ·         A sense of entitlement (to special treatment)
  • ·         Exploitation of others
  • ·         A lack of empathy
  • ·         Envy of others or the belief that one is the object of envy
  • ·         Arrogant, haughty behavior or attitudes



Researchers have reported associations between NPD and high rates of substance abuse, mood, and anxiety disorders.

Psychotherapy is the key approach in the treatment of narcissistic personality disorder. 

People with NPD tend to be self-obsessed, believing others are the problem, so many see no reason to attend counselling. They can interpret encouragement to seek help as criticism, and respond very defensively, deflecting fault onto others. A useful technique to encourage therapy is suggesting that a shared problem or issue exists, focussing on things you both can work through.


DISCLAIMER: All the information being provided her has been sourced from the internet and books and some also via personal experiences. It has no medical authentication per se so suggestions if followed must be done in consultation with a trained mental health professional.

References:




This post is a part of April Blogging from A To Z Challenge
You can find all my posts here.





Monday, April 15, 2019

M - Mood Disorders #AtoZ #MentalHealthAwaress

Mood disorders are a category of illnesses that describe a serious change in mood. If your emotions and moods seem out of your control over a long period of time, you may have a mood disorder. 


Moods are our emotions. They affect us every day. Sometimes we’re sad, other times we’re happy. We might even be sad and happy in the same day. But sometimes people’s mood can get “stuck” on sad. Or the moods might change a lot or become extreme. When this happens, it affects our lives. And it might be caused by a group of mental illnesses called mood disorders.

Mood disorders fall into the basic groups of elevated mood, such as mania or hypomania; depressed mood, of which the best-known and most researched is major depressive disorder (MDD) (commonly called clinical depression, unipolar depression, or major depression); and moods which cycle between mania and depression.



Illness under mood disorders include: major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder (mania - euphoric, hyperactive, over inflated ego, unrealistic optimism), persistent depressive disorder (long lasting low grade depression), cyclothymia (a mild form of bipolar disorder), and SAD (seasonal affective disorder).

These disorders, also called affective disorders, may involve:
  • ·         Feeling sad all the time
  • ·         Losing interest in important parts of life
  • ·         Fluctuating between extreme happiness and extreme sadness





Some examples of mood disorders include:

  • ·         Major depressive disorder — prolonged and persistent periods of extreme sadness.

  • ·         Bipolar disorder — also called manic depression or bipolar affective disorder, depression that includes alternating times of depression and mania.

  • ·         Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) — a form of depression most often associated with fewer hours of daylight in the far northern and southern latitudes from late fall to early spring.

  • ·         Cyclothymic disorder — a disorder that causes emotional ups and downs that are less extreme than bipolar disorder.

  • ·         Premenstrual dysphoric disorder — mood changes and irritability that occur during the premenstrual phase of a woman's cycle and go away with the onset of menses.

  • ·        Persistent depressive disorder (dysthymia) — a long-term (chronic) form of depression.

  • ·         Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder — a disorder of chronic, severe and persistent irritability in children that often includes frequent temper outbursts that are inconsistent with the child's developmental age.

  • ·         Depression related to medical illness — a persistent depressed mood and a significant loss of pleasure in most or all activities that's directly related to the physical effects of another medical condition

  • ·         Depression induced by substance use or medication ― depression symptoms that develop during or soon after substance use or withdrawal or after exposure to a medication






DISCLAIMER: All the information being provided her has been sourced from the internet and books and some also via personal experiences. It has no medical authentication per se so suggestions if followed must be done in consultation with a trained mental health professional.

References:


This post is a part of April Blogging from A To Z Challenge
You can find all my posts here.



COMPANIONS CALLED BOOKS

To Kill a Mockingbird
The Catcher in the Rye
Animal Farm
The Alchemist
One Hundred Years of Solitude
Romeo and Juliet
Frankenstein
The Odyssey
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
The Count of Monte Cristo
Eat, Pray, Love
Lolita
The Da Vinci Code
The Kite Runner
The Silence of the Lambs
The Diary of a Young Girl
Pride and Prejudice
Jane Eyre
The Notebook
Gone With the Wind
}

Orange Flower Awards

I WILL RING THE BELL.WILL YOU?

The Human Bean Cafe, Ontario

The Human Bean Cafe, Ontario
my work on display there !!!!!